Posts tagged "lgbtq*"

Helping a Loved One Through and Anxiety Attack

Its common knowledge that many people in the LGBTQ* community suffer from some form of mental illness. An increasingly common one is social anxiety (or even just anxiety that can be triggered by multiple things). It is important to know how to react and take care of a loved one if an anxiety or panic attack sets in. 

Step one: talk to your loved one about what they need to happen if they begin to lose control. Do they have any medications that they need to take? Is there a specific food or beverage that they need made for them to calm down? Do they need someone to stand by them during the panic or do they need to be left alone? Where do they need you to bring them and do for them so they can calm down?

Step two: Learn the signs of their attacks. It is easy to tell when someone starts to lose control if you know their triggers and their behavior patterns at the start of a panic attack. 

Step three: Get them home as quickly as possible. If they are able to speak openly, listen to what they need at that moment. Get it done as quickly and as calmly as possible. If they are not able to speak, you have to take control. Avoid smothering them. Don’t hug them or ask questions because that will make it worse. 

Step four: Get them some place dark and cool. Continue to listen to what they need without asking questions. Do not ask what is wrong. If they have totally lost control, get them out of their clothes and into someplace comfortable (like bed). Cover them with a light blanket but make sure there are more available for them. 

Step five: make sure they take the medication they need to take (many people have a quick acting xanax that they use). Keep listening to what they need. Make them some tea and something they typically like to eat and bring it to them just so its there. 

Step six: leave them alone. They will call you if they need you and you can check on them periodically but do not talk to them or ask whats wrong. All they need is someone to help them get to a safe spot. They don’t need to talk. Talking will increase their anxiety. 

Step seven: when its over, do not ask what was wrong. You can acknowledge it. Hug them and tell them you’re glad they are safe. Do not patronize them. Making them feel like they are crazy or need to be taken care of is demeaning.  They just need someone supportive. 

They will talk to you in there own time. Wait for them to bring up what was wrong. Above all remember to listen to their needs and body language. Do not smother them because they need time for themselves. During an anxiety attack, your only job is to get them to a safe spot, get them their medications and whatever calms them down, and leave them alone unless they ask you otherwise. 

Posted by Colette


pantslessprogressive:
“Today, I’m announcing my support for a law that gives same-sex couples in our state the right to receive a marriage license in Washington - the same right given our heterosexual couples. It is time, it is the right thing to do, and I will introduce the bill to make it happen.” - Washington Governor Chris Gregoire.
Gregorie says she will propose legislation to legalize same-sex marriage when the legislative session begins Monday.

It’s always nice to hear about somebody who actually believes in full equality.

Reblogged by Party Marty

pantslessprogressive:

“Today, I’m announcing my support for a law that gives same-sex couples in our state the right to receive a marriage license in Washington - the same right given our heterosexual couples. It is time, it is the right thing to do, and I will introduce the bill to make it happen.” - Washington Governor Chris Gregoire.

Gregorie says she will propose legislation to legalize same-sex marriage when the legislative session begins Monday.

It’s always nice to hear about somebody who actually believes in full equality.

Reblogged by Party Marty

(via projectqueer)

The Media

So let’s talk about queer people in the media. At first glance, many people may look at the way queers are portrayed in the media, and start to shun society for its promotion of stereotypes. While, some may also see any portrayal of LGBTQ* people in the media as positive, and a way to get people to recognize the LGBTQ* rights movement. Personally, I find myself more likely to agree with the latter, and say that to ask for only positive portrayals of queer individuals is to ask too much, considering that both positive and negative portrayals of straight people are shown in the media. Yet, it is obvious that most LGBTQ* characters in the media are stereotypical. This is why it is absolutely necessary for more LGBTQ* people to be portrayed in the media so that a more accurate spectrum is shown.

Posted by Party Marty

DUH WERLD.

So, to forgive that lapse in professionalism, it is time for us to discuss LGBTQ* rights in places that aren’t the US. People often overlook the progress of LGBTQ* rights abroad, but I find that to be counterproductive. In much of the world, people can still be given the death penalty or incarceration for being queer, and the majority of countries still don’t have full marriage equality. As a community, we often focus on just our own countries when it comes to fighting for equality, but it is exactly this selfishness and apathy that hinders our goal.

Posted by Party Marty

Being alright with your own sexual and gender fluidity

Main stream society would have us believe that there are just two categories for sexuality and gender. Gay or Straight. Male or Female. So it may be difficult for those of us who identify with multiple genders and sexualities to come to terms with how fluid we actually are. I personally have a hard time admitting to myself that there are times when I am attracted to men, and other times when I’m not sexual at all. I feel like it would be easier if I could just be strictly attracted to women because it would be easier to explain and easier emotionally, but if I only dated women I might miss out on someone I might really connect with. And explaining my gender to others can sometimes be a struggle. A lot of people don’t understand how I can feel male one day, and female the next. However, I’ve learned it doesn’t matter what other people think as long as I am alright with being genderqueer and pansexual. We have to be true to who we really are, and accepting our fluidity is part of that. In the end, it will make us happier people.

Posted by Colette

Coming soon…

KalamaQueer presents “QueerVlogs,” a series of vlogs that will discuss LGBTQ* life and address LGBTQ* issues! The first vlogs will be introductions to all four of the KQs that are on the podcast, with more topics coming soon after. Make sure that you watch them when they come out! This is something you’re not going to want to miss!

Posted by Party Marty

Info! - Two-Spirit

A Native America/First Nation individual who, in their community, encompasses the gender roles given to both men and women. They are often revered as being divine due to their ability to fulfill both roles. The term “berdaches” was once used to describe Two-Spirit people but is now out-dated due to the fact that the term comes from the French word for a male prostitute.

Posted by Party Marty

Just because

You’re queer doesn’t mean that you don’t have privilege. Don’t ever forget that. I myself know that I have White privilege, class privilege, able-bodied privilege, cisgender privilege, among other things. So, from that, we as queer people need to recognize that among our community we have racists, classists, transphobes, and ableists and it is up to all of us to ensure that we control this.

Posted by Party Marty

Accent theme by Handsome Code

A blog about LGBTQ* life and LGBTQ* issues, to serve as a companion to the podcast by the same name: www.kalamaqueerzz.podbean.com

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